Main Street Millwork
Main Street Millwork
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Plank Flooring

Main Street Millwork has been manufacturing plank flooring since 1987. Our attention to appearance and precision has made us a favorite with installers and contractors for more than 20 years. We work with mills nationwide to procure the hardest to find species and grades. As we have been the outside expert manufacturer for a dozen or so other flooring sellers, many people have bought our flooring and not known it. Whether you are a homeowner, an architect or a contractor, we have the high-quality plank flooring you seek.

Open Grained Hardwoods
Open grain simply means the vessels which conduct the sap through the tree trunk are large and therefore visible, contributing significantly to its appearance. These species tend to have a cathedral appearance to their grain pattern. Open grain woods make for durable and beautiful flooring.

   

Rift Sawn White Oak
Rift Sawn White Oak

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White Oak
White oak is a dense open grained wood abundant throughout the Ohio valley. It offers a rich medium color. It is frequently sold quarter sawn producing the familiar figure one sees in high–end furniture, paneling, and flooring. Rift sawn produces a uniform straight line grain. We also use it flat sawn which gives the cathedral grain pattern characteristic of open grain woods. White oak is also popular as a rustic floor which shows sound defects and more color variation. We do the rustic in both flat and quarter sawn.
   

Quarter Sawn Red Oak
Quarter Sawn Red Oak

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Red Oak
Red oak is the most commonly used and recognizable North American hardwood. Being located in New England we are close to the most desirable red oak available. New England red oak is known for its consistent wheat color and even density. Red oak is quarter sawn and is the best value in quarter sawn flooring.
   

Quarter Sawn Hickory
Quarter Sawn Hickory

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Hickory
Hickory is a dense open grained wood like white oak or ash however it resembles ash more so in it’s texture and appearance. Hickory is prized for its cinnamon colored heart wood and almost platinum sap wood. Consequently there is an attractive contrast between the heart and the sap. Hickory is requested in clear grades and frequently is requested as rustic. Hickory is one of the better priced hardwoods.
   

Ash
Ash

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Ash
Ash is the unsung hero of North American hardwoods. It is abundant, dries well, mills beautifully and is very stable. It is normally sold as a heart sap mix — like the hickory — however there is less contrast between the heart and the sap than the hickory. Its best attribute is that it is the least expensive of plank flooring choices. Our ash comes almost exclusively from New England and upstate New York. It is usually sold on a 3” or 4” face, but wide board floors (5”+) are also easy to source and manufacture.
   

Cherry/Walnut Mix
Black Walnut/Cherry Mix

Black Walnut
Probably the most prized and well known American wood, it is used primarily for furniture and high end interior millwork. However, it makes for a very rich hardwood floor. It is sold heart/sap or heart only. Walnut rustics are becoming more popular as well. Because of its dark color, it is used in smaller spaces such as studies but the photograph of the Green Trees Gallery (left) shows it can be a stunning floor in a large open interior as well.
   
Closed Grain Hardwoods
Closed grain woods have sap vessels too small to notice. In some woods, they do form part of the appearance of the wood but it is not as striking as open grained species. These woods tend have a smooth surface and a grain pattern which wanders (for lack of a better word). Like any other species, the close grained woods are a good flooring choice for stability, durability and beauty.
   

Cherry
Cherry

Cherry
American cherry is one of the premier American species. Cherry is noted for its rich red color and delicate grain pattern. It ages to a deep oxblood color. It fits well in formal or informal settings. It is most often used in a clear grade with a 90% red (heart) face but is also popular in a rustic grade. Cherry is abundant and can be procured in wide widths. Most of the cherry we use is from western Pennsylvania or southwestern New York however we have used New England stock with great results as well.
   
  Yellow Birch
Yellow birch is another wood which is a staple of northern New England forests. It is noted for its milky sap wood, brownish red heart wood, and flame pattern. Birch is available all sap wood which produces one of the prettiest white floors. It can be made with all heart wood which is known as ‘red birch’. It is also done as a heart/sap mix – ‘natural birch’. Birch tends to be narrow and short so wide floors can be difficult to find. This specie is also common as a rustic.
   

Maple 2
Maple

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Hard Maple
Hard Maple is another species for which New England is famous. New England hard maple is sought out the world over for its brilliant white color. It is put up primarily white – sap – but it is also available with the heartwood too. Hard maple is extremely durable and neutral in appearance. It has been used in many high-impact applications: Gym floors, factory floors, bowling alleys, retail spaces, etc. We have sold it into homes as single width 3” sap or all 8” heart and just about everything in between. It is ordered rustic as well.
   

Brown Hard Maple
Brown Hard Maple

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Brown Hard Maple
Brown hard maple is a heart sap mix.  This stock has a nice milk chocolate heart mixed with the white sap on the edges.  It has the same toughness as sap maple but a very different more informal look.  It also is easier to get wide boards in the brown as you are sawing farther into the log to get the darker color.  This is frequently sold as rustic – showing frequent sound defects.

   

Exotics
There is an almost endless variety of imported species. Most of them are extraordinarily beautiful. We have the most experience with jatoba and sapele. Most exotics have a mahogany-like grain but show different hues and densities. The lumber is usually very consistent in color and graining and has a formal or modern look to it. The floors we have sent out are always stunning. Jatoba is dark red and the sapele is a milk chocolate brown. Sapele is also available in quarter sawn. Both of these woods have excellent rot resistance and can be used outdoor. Don’t, however, feel limited to these two, as there many others to choose from — alfzelia, blood wood, wenge, utile, meranti, etc.

Note that while forestry practices in North America are excellent and closely monitored, imported species need to be monitored for their source concerning forestry practices. We rely on the importers for that information.